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On a run one day, I was filled with self-doubt and had a thought pop into my head.  "Own it, live it, be it".  Many  distance and endurance athletes, and their coaches, talk about the value of a mantra.  I realized I had just found mine.  Own it.  Realize where you are and be good with that.  If you want more, set a goal. More than that, a plan.  Live it.  You have dreams, goals.  Live in a way to achieve them.  Be it.  Be who you are, striving for your goals until you are there. 

Own it. Live it. Be it. 

A little more about me... (and my running).

I grew up in small town Indiana.  I started running in middle school because it was either join the band, or the cross-country team.  I really had no idea what cross-country was, but I knew I didn't have any rhythm (still don't).  Turns out, I was pretty good.  Back then, there were no boys and girls teams.  There was cross-country.   And, I started placing near the top of, and even winning, cross-country meets.  As I mentioned on the home page, that early momentum carried me through high school and a few years as a collegiate runner.  Those years formed the basis of my love, my passion, for the running life.  But, I did not realize the value of it until many years later. 

I decided I was going to train for a marathon.  I really had no idea what I was doing, but I've come to find out many people who train for, and complete, marathons don't really know what they're doing.  I got hurt.  Injured.  The worst fate of any runner, any athlete (though I didn't really consider myself an athlete then). Sports medicine, chiropractor, no one  could figure out the problem.  Months passed.  I couldn't run.  I was walking with a limp (from being too stubborn earlier and trying to "run through it").  Finally, someone figured it out.  Fixed me.  I could run again.  But a marathon.  Never.  Then April 15, 2013.  Boston Marathon.  Bombs? Terrorists?  I, like many others, realized then that I am a runner.  It defines me. Terrorists can't attack us and scare us away from what we do, what we love.  I will run a marathon.  I will qualify for Boston.  I will run the Boston Marathon.  So,  my marathoning career was set in motion.  I ran my first marathon in November, 2013 and missed my BQ time by less than 5 minutes.  I ran my second marathon in February, 2014 and made my BQ time by over 5 minutes.  Now I'm working on running a BQ marathon in all 50 states. 

In my marathoning career, I have been primarily self-coached (well... with the help of my husband, so maybe not 'entirely'), only recently hiring a coach.  I'm not only a runner, but a student of the science of running.  And the experience.  I have read many (and my husband has read even more) books on running. From autobiographies reliving the path of some of the sports' greats, to in-depth sports science.  Understanding why certain training strategies work on a fundamental level.  Now I feel equipped to tackle some big goals, some great goals.